Monthly Archives: June 2012

The biggest change in 6E

If you’re still making noises about Allies: stop.  I’m tired of hearing people complain about/try to break the rules.

Much more significantly, it’s not the biggest rule change in the new book.

“Bigger Games”, page 110:
This being the case, if you’re playing a game of 2,000 points or more, you can take an additional primary detachment. This gives you access to up to six choices each from elites, fast attack and heavy support, up to four HQ choices, a massive potential of up to twelve troops choices, and additional allied detachment and an additional fortification.

This is huge.  It means 2,000 point games are explicitly not in the range of default game sizes.  It means crazy shit like 8 HQ choices in a 2,000 Space Wolf army.  It means I could drop over 50% of my points on HQs in my Daemon army.

New Edition – Acquired!

40K 6E’s here!

As planned, Casey, Ashley, blogless Bart and I drove out to the Bowie Bunker for the midnight release.

Unfortunately, a severe thunderstorm hit both us and the Bunker on the way up.  The drive up was crazy: we saw thee wind blow one of those giant “<--" signs across a lane of traffic and into the side of a truck.  We had to dodge a orange traffic barrel as it blew across our lane.  It was crazy.

It also knocked out power at the Bunker, which was kind of a drag.

Instead of being able to check out the Bunker’s new digs, take pictures with the space marine, and maybe/maybe not buy random Warhammer 40,000 swag … we couldn’t actually go into the bunker to look around, much less buy anything.  Totally, utterly understandable, but it was kind of a long, dangerous drive in the middle of the night to just collect a box and go.

I suppose I should be thankful that they handed out preorders; there would have been Problems if they hadn’t, but still, I appreciate it.

Haven’t gotten anywhere with the book yet: Friday was a long day for me, but on an initial casual flip-through it’s the most beautiful book Games Workshop’s published yet… and given how gorgeous Warhammer Fantasy 8E was, that says a lot.

Great job, GW!

On Battlefoam’s Customer Service – Results

So, you might remember my kinda nuts order into Battlefoam earlier this month.

Well, it showed up this afternoon, I’m ecstatic about it, and figured I’d share the results.

Just about a week after my order, they got back to me with a layout.

I suggested collapsing a few of the filler shapes into each other.  The result:

Well, as I said the trays just showed up in the mail.

The filler for the Demigryph shapes were included: I’ll shave them down after I’ve glued the riders on (when they’ll be needed).

So, as you can see, Battlefoam did an amazing job of taking my heap of requirements and cobbling them together into into some trays that do exactly what I need them to do.  As I said, they’ve got exemplary customer service.

Also, since I was taking pictures and I don’t think I’ve posted it here: this foam topper was a last-minute upsell when I placed my Black Friday order back in November.  It’s based on the display sign I knocked together for the NoVA Open and run through some filters in Gimp. I’m really happy with how it came out, and as I’m working on more display signs, I’m keeping foam toppers in mind.

Firearms

I’m not entirely pleased with the way WFRP 2E handles firearms.

For the Old World, it’s fine, but for Thirty Years’ War, they’re too advanced and reliable. There’s even a few paragraphs in the Old World Armoury that talks about the evolution of firearms in the Old World from hand gonnes to matchlocks to wheellocks and flintlocks and on to the “modern” handgun.  Those wheellocks and matchlocks, though, saw use in addition to flintlocks.

Unfortunately OWA doesn’t do anything with them mechanically.  So, I’m going to cobble something together on my own.  At the same time, one thing I very much appreciate about WFRP is how it just says, “Whatever man, it’s a Hand Weapon,” and doesn’t get too persnickety about details beyond that.  Weighing things down with details for details’ sake isn’t going to do me any favors.


Pistols and Firearms are either Matchlock, Wheellock, or Firelock (Flintlock).

  • Matchlocks – as Firearm/Pistol, but Unreliable range is 15% larger (attack rolls of 81-98 mean a roll on the Misfire Chart) and is Rare.
  • Wheellock – as Firearm/Pistol, but Unreliable range is 10% larger (attack rolls of 86-98 mean a roll on the Misfire Chart).
  • Firelock – as Firearm/Pistol, but 5% more difficult to acquire.

Type Misfire Explodes Rarity
Matchlock 81-98 99-00 Rare
Wheellock 86-98 99-00 Very Rare
Firelock 96-98 99-00 Very Rare (-5%)


When firing an Unreliable weapon, if the roll falls within the Misfire range, regardless if the roll would have been successful, there will be a secret roll on the Misfire Chart.  Experimental weapons will roll on the Advanced Misfire Chart in Old World Armoury.

Misfire Chart
Roll Result
01-20 Partial burn. Not all the powder catches; range and effective strength are halved (rounding fractions up) for this shot only.
21-50 Charge fails to ignite; try again next round.
51-70 Chage fails to ignite; reload and try again.
71-80 Slow burn, or ‘hang fire.’ The priming goes off, but nothing else seems to happen. However the weapon will fire in the following round, with potentially dangerous consequences. Anyone who is stupid enough to look down the barrel of a gun which has hung firetakes an automatic point blank head hit.
81-90 Flash in the pan. The powder around the touchhole ignites in a bright flash, but the gun does not go off. The gun must be reprimed before it can be fired again; this takes one round. The firer suffers a BS-10% on the reprimed shot, due to an understandable degree of nervousness about what is to happen next…
91-98 Burn-round. The powder catches, but the shot is either insufficiently wadded or a little too small for the barrel. The net result is that the heat of the burning powder welds the shot into the barrel. The weapon is now useless and has a 50% chance of exploding if anyone tries to use it again. A successful Challenging Trade (Gunsmith) Skill Test will repair it.
99-00 Weapon explodes, inflicting normal damage on the wielder and is destroyed.


Musket-Rest: Allows for a an Aim (Full Action) action.  If the following action is a Standard Attack, gain BS+20%.


The Misfire Chart in the core book is boring (it jams! it blows up!) and unrealistic (if it jams, you need a Trade roll to fix it).  The Advanced Misfire Chart in Old World Armoury is kinda brutal (40-50% chance of it blowing up); though I’m okay with it for Experimental weapons.  The above chart is effectively the Advanced Misfires Chart from WFRP 1E’s Warhammer Companion.

Also: the musket-rest is key.  I love them. Gotta be there.

Harkenwold: Reaved

This past Friday’s session was, as I’d hoped was the last session of the Reavers of Harkenwold campaign. As I’d expected, it ended in a TPK.

In the penultimate session, the heroes had headed to Iron Keep to kill/arrest Nazin Redthorn and cripple the Iron Circle’s ambitions in the area.  They’d scouted around the keep, located the keep’s sally port, and broke in.  I was pleased and surprised by this: the writer certainly hadn’t accounted for the PCs avoiding the front door entirely and the sally port was on the first floor of what’s effectively the final building (side-stepping a lot of fighting).

They’re going to end this thing, yeah.

The folks on the other sally port put up more of a fight than the heroes expected, though, and the battle frightened several servants who ran away.  This made the party too nervous… so they hoofed it.

In the aftermath, the keep was on high alert, and sent out some patrols to find the group that snuck in, stabbed some people and left.  A plan was formed to ambush one of those patrols, murder them, and sneak into the Keep disguised as members of the Iron Circle.  (As I’d recast the Iron Circle as human supremacists, the party’s dwarf and goliath would be “prisoners.)

So, at this point, they’d (effectively) done it the easy way, decided it was too hard, and then decided to go back and do it the hard way.

In the final session, they made contact with another patrol, Bluffed them convincingly, and then accompanied them to the keep’s gate.

Bluff rolls were extremely good, for the record.  Too good for the party’s own good, really; they let the heroes dig themselves a deeper and deeper hole before things hit the fan.

They’d convinced the gate commander they were legitimate.  The portcullis was coming up… and one of the members of the patrol they’d bamboozled noticed something wrong with the rope “restraining” the party’s dwarven cleric.

“He’s getting loose!”

At this point, I expected one the other PCs to punch him in and “subdue” him.

Instead, they basically did this:

So, that happened.  The thief, tumbled under the half-raised portcullis, ran into a nearby tower, and was engaged by a clanking iron dog.  The goliath jumped high and scrambled over the rampart over the gate.

The rest of the party stuck together outside of the keep and fought the rest of the patrol they’d tricked.

To be clear, the party’s now split: one guy in full view of half the keep’s sentries (and their crossbows), another locked in a tower with a robot dog, and three guys sticking together but blowing their rolls and standing in front of some murderholes.

I low-balled a few things (the gatehouse door was suspiciously easy to break down, for example), but the combat started off grim and only got grimmer.  There was a whole group of sentinels, for example, in full view of the combat completely unmolested by the PCs over entirely too many turns for them not to have called for help.

So, just as they’re finally getting a grip on their enemies… another wave showed up and, well, yeah.

There was a great deal of laudable, “I can get to your corpse in time!” that sadly proved untrue.  And, of course, once one PC drops, it’s downhill from there.


I’m not sorry for it, though.  As I’ve said, I was ready to be done with the campaign, and I think the players were, too.  I’m ready for the next thing, clearly.  And, really: it was the only way things could have reasonably worked out.  I didn’t go out of my way for the TPK… it was inevitable.

Mantic Kickstarter

There’s less than 8 hours left on the Mantic Kickstarter!  Now’s a really great opportunity to get a heap of minis at a really great deal!

Don’t miss out!

Warhammer 40,006!

Finally!  Sixth Edition’s up for preorder!

I ordered mine last night; I’m really looking forward to playing 40K again (I basically stopped after Grey Knights came out).

Casey, Ashley, blogless Bart, and I will be hitting the GW Bowie Bunker‘s midnight release event to pick up our copies.  If you’re planning to be there, too, give me a shout so I know to say hi!